Makanan tradisional anda???

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Re: Makanan tradisional anda???

Postby tingau » Thu Jun 23, 2011 1:54 am

orangaslisabah wrote:
owl wrote:wah..ambuyaat.nyaman :drool2: ....ada juga berbelas tahun tidak makan.. :cry: :cry:

sadap kaini?? :hmmm:

sadap.......tapi macam tu gam mau bah rupa dia ni.... :lol2: ko mo makan... :slaugh:
Meeeooowww...
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Re: Makanan tradisional anda???

Postby orangaslisabah » Sun Jun 26, 2011 7:35 pm

tingau wrote:
orangaslisabah wrote:
owl wrote:wah..ambuyaat.nyaman :drool2: ....ada juga berbelas tahun tidak makan.. :cry: :cry:

sadap kaini?? :hmmm:

sadap.......tapi macam tu gam mau bah rupa dia ni.... :lol2: ko mo makan... :slaugh:

isss...enda maulah kalau mcm gam

[spoiler]Ambuyat is a Bruneian dish derived from the interior trunk of the sago palm. It is a starchy bland substance, similar to tapioca starch.

Ambuyat is eaten with a bamboo fork called a chandas, by rolling the starch around the prongs and then dipping it into a sour fruit sauce.Another unique flavour from Sabah is Ambuyat. It's very famous among bisaya people of klias peninsular.

Ambuyat, is a gluey "porridge" with sago starch. It's using a pair of chopsticks cut from the rib of the sago palm to twirl it up into a sticky mass for dunking in a tasty sauce.

The murut or " hill people " living in Sabah 's interior, make a subtance similar to Ambuyat, grating and washing the starch out of topioca roots rather than the sago palm. Both boiled tapioca and sago starch are enjoyed on occasion by various kadazan dusun peoples , although rice - particularly hill rice grown on the slopes of the crocker range - remains the number one favourite.

Ambuyat also famous at Sarawak especially among the melanau people . It is because they are like sago very much too.

The Ambuyat is suitable as a snack, breakfast, tea-time or even supper.

You may find this food at most of the "Tamu" markets or street markets in Sabah.Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei. Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei. Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei. Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei. Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei. Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei. Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei. Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei. Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei. Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei. Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei. Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei. Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei. Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei. Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei. Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei. Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei. Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei. Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei. Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei. Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei. Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei. Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei. Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei. Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth).[/spoiler]
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Re: Makanan tradisional anda???

Postby BosouTurongou » Wed Jun 29, 2011 7:40 am

Bukit_Padang_Roller wrote:
BosouTurongou wrote:
Bukit_Padang_Roller wrote:tatap jg tu ambuyaat :lol2:

apaini barang aaa... :hmmm:

tadaaaa :mrgreen:
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dia kna bt dr sagu baitu :mrgreen:
sadap ni klau mkn ramai2 :thumbup1:

kalau org bugis panggil keporong kaini... :hmmm:
Buli Runding bah..!!!
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Re: Makanan tradisional anda???

Postby sheila85 » Wed Jun 29, 2011 8:13 am

kalu d sini tu nasi ambeng :thumbup1:
"Kekuatan tidak datang dari kemampuan fizikal,tetapi ianya datang dari semangat yang tidak pernah mengalah."
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Re: Makanan tradisional anda???

Postby gampalid » Wed Jun 29, 2011 10:29 am

ambuyat tu mcm hingus yg paling kental kaitu :lolrf:
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Re: Makanan tradisional anda???

Postby orangaslisabah » Thu Jul 14, 2011 11:22 am

gampalid wrote:ambuyat tu mcm hingus yg paling kental kaitu :lolrf:

ambuyat sodap akh?? :hmmm:

[spoiler]Ambuyat is a Bruneian dish derived from the interior trunk of the sago palm. It is a starchy bland substance, similar to tapioca starch.

Ambuyat is eaten with a bamboo fork called a chandas, by rolling the starch around the prongs and then dipping it into a sour fruit sauce.Another unique flavour from Sabah is Ambuyat. It's very famous among bisaya people of klias peninsular.

Ambuyat, is a gluey "porridge" with sago starch. It's using a pair of chopsticks cut from the rib of the sago palm to twirl it up into a sticky mass for dunking in a tasty sauce.

The murut or " hill people " living in Sabah 's interior, make a subtance similar to Ambuyat, grating and washing the starch out of topioca roots rather than the sago palm. Both boiled tapioca and sago starch are enjoyed on occasion by various kadazan dusun peoples , although rice - particularly hill rice grown on the slopes of the crocker range - remains the number one favourite.

Ambuyat also famous at Sarawak especially among the melanau people . It is because they are like sago very much too.

The Ambuyat is suitable as a snack, breakfast, tea-time or even supper.

You may find this food at most of the "Tamu" markets or street markets in Sabah.Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei. Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei. Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei. Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei. Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei. Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei. Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei. Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei. Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei. Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei. Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei. Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei. Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei. Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei. Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei. Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei. Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei. Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei. Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei. Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei. Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei. Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei. Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei. Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei. Ambuyat is unique to Brunei as well as to Bruneians. It is a type of starch taken especially during lunchtime and mostly on Friday afternoons or anytime you fancy really.

It’s glue-like appearance (top left) and bland taste might not be appetising but the trick is actually to dip it in the accompanying sauce known as cacah and swallowing it whole. Cacah or the dip can either be made from local fruits known as binjai or pidada or from fermented shrimps known locally as cencalu. Normally the cacah is sour but may be added in with chillies for those who like it hot or more chillies to make it hotter. Ambuyat taste best while hot so be very careful when swallowing it.If you do get your experience of your lifetime in accidentally swallowing a very hot ambuyat, don’t panic. My mom, who quoted an old wives’ tale, said to hug a banana tree instead of gulping cold water. She wasn’t sure sure why banana tree but thought that maybe banana is cool (I thought cucumber is cool? No? But then again cucumber is a creepy veggie, not a tree).

There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth). Rumbia or sago trees take ten years to mature. I have no information on the number of such trees still intact in Brunei.There are other races in this world who make full use of the sago tree. We have the Penans of Sarawak who processes sago flour from sago tree. The Kombai tribe, one of the tribes found in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, also eat the pit from the sago tree though I am sure they don’t have our cacah nor chandas (the two-pronged chopstick made from bamboo use to twirl and place Ambuyat in your mouth).[/spoiler]
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Re: Makanan tradisional anda???

Postby Shu Khi » Tue Jul 19, 2011 11:08 am

Huhu..ari tu sia balik kg..saya mask tu jantung pisang Sabah..bukan masak lemak/santan..tapi masak lain lg..nd atau apa nama masakan tu..cara dia mudah saja..tu jantung pisang ko belah 4 kalau yg besar..buang tu kelopak yg di luar sampai jumpa kelopak yg tidak merah..then rebus sampai mendidih..kasi tos pastu kasi sejuk dulu sebelum di hiris melintang,halus-halus..then ko campur tu perencah maggi paitu..sesedap rasa kah atau secukup rasa..pastu ko perah dgn limau kasturi.. :thumbup1: :drool2:

buli juga dicampur ikan sardin,bilis atau belacan.. :thumbup1:
mana-mana ja...
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Re: Makanan tradisional anda???

Postby Anadiz » Tue Jul 19, 2011 1:36 pm

Shu Khi wrote:Huhu..ari tu sia balik kg..saya mask tu jantung pisang Sabah..bukan masak lemak/santan..tapi masak lain lg..nd atau apa nama masakan tu..cara dia mudah saja..tu jantung pisang ko belah 4 kalau yg besar..buang tu kelopak yg di luar sampai jumpa kelopak yg tidak merah..then rebus sampai mendidih..kasi tos pastu kasi sejuk dulu sebelum di hiris melintang,halus-halus..then ko campur tu perencah maggi paitu..sesedap rasa kah atau secukup rasa..pastu ko perah dgn limau kasturi.. :thumbup1: :drool2:

buli juga dicampur ikan sarding, bilis atau belacang.. :thumbup1:


:slaugh: :slaugh: trganue kita juga last2.. :slaugh: :slaugh:
Anadiz
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Re: Makanan tradisional anda???

Postby orangaslisabah » Sat Aug 13, 2011 2:19 pm

Kamu makan kah bosou :mrgreen:


[spoiler]Bosou atau juga dikenali sebagai Tonsom merupakan salah satu merupakan salah satu hidangan sampingan tradisional istimewa bagi suku kaum Kadazan-Dusun, Sabah. Bosou merupakan makanan tradisi yang menyerupai perkasam atau 'jeruk'. Bagi suku kaum Ranau, ia dikenali sebagai 'tinamba'. Bosou biasanya dihasilkan dari ikan Kepayang ("Pangium edule") atau daripada daging mentah hasil perburuan.
Cara membuat Bosou

Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.

Oleh kerana bosou mempunyai bau yang kuat, biasanya bekas menyimpan bosou dibuat kedap udara. Ini kerana bagi mengelakkan ia menarik dan dicemari lalat dan bagi mengelakkan pertumbuhan fungi. Bekas tradisi bagi menyimpan bosou adalah botol berbentuk labu yang ditutup dengan lilin lebah. Bekas tradisi lain termasuk kakanan, tetapi kini ia telah digantikan dengan bekas plastik dan botol kaca. Biasanya bosou disimpan selama lima sehingga tujuh hari sebelum dihidangkan.

Bosou boleh dihidangkan begitu sahaja atau dimasak terlebih dahulu. Bosou biasanya dimasak bagi menghilangkan bau dan bagi menambah perisanya. Bawang, cili , dan bahan lain boleh ditambah bagi menambah perisa semasa memasak. Asasnya, masakan kaum dusun ini adalah makanan yang direbus sahaja. Kebanyakan masyarakat Dusun menggemari sayur-sayuran segar sebagai hidangan yang dinikmati bersama nasi putih bersama bosou ini, sama seperti hidangan budu atau tempoyak yang terdapat di semenanjung Malaysia.Bosou is a signature dish for Kadazan Dusun. Bosou-making is simple, yet need practices for a perfection. Typical ingredients are including raw freshwater fish, pangi (Malay – kepayang, Scientific name – Pangium edule), salt, steamed rice and some other optional ingredients such as jackfruits, young pineapple fruits, tuhau, etc.

The making of bosou is very simple. First, all the ingredients are mixed thoroughly. Salt is usually added in excess to prolong the shelf life of the bosou. If warm rice is to be used, the mixture is cooled to room temperature before storing. Storing of bosou usually takes in a tight-closed container.

The traditional container for the bosou is the bottle-shaped gourd which is sealed with some bees-wax. Other traditional container includes kakanan. But now the traditional containers are replaced with tupperwares, glass bottles etc. Storing of bosou usually takes about five to seven days before it is can be eaten. Due to it’s strong smell and compost-like nature, it is advised to tight-close the container to avoid flies to take ‘control’ of the bosou and also to avoid growth of fungi.

Bosou can be eaten raw or cooked. Cooking is usually done to get rid of the smell and to enhance the taste of the bosou. Some may add dried onions, chillies and other ingredients during the cooking.

It’s always a pleasure to have bosou as a side dish.Bosou, dalam bahasa Malaysia bererti jeruk. Ia diperbuat daripada ikan basah, daging dan sayur-sayuran seperti 'polod' (kulit sejenis pokok palma) lalu dicampur dengan 'panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Bosou merupakan makanan kegemaran orang KadazanDusun sejak dahulu lagi. Ia biasanya dimakan secara berkumpulan seperti ahli keluarga.

Bosou yang terkenal ialah Bosou Ikan (dicampur dengan batang pisang atau 'polod').

Resipi:


Ikan Turongo

Nasi

Panggi

Sayur Polod atau batang pisang

Garam

Campurkan bahan-bahan tersebut sehingga rata. Kemudian, masukkan ke dalam bekas (tempayan kecil) dan tutup rapat supaya tidak di masuki angin. Biarkan selama 2 minggu.Bosou, dalam bahasa Malaysia bererti jeruk. Ia diperbuat daripada ikan basah, daging dan sayur-sayuran seperti 'polod' (kulit sejenis pokok palma) lalu dicampur dengan 'panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Bosou merupakan makanan kegemaran orang KadazanDusun sejak dahulu lagi. Ia biasanya dimakan secara berkumpulan seperti ahli keluarga.

Bosou yang terkenal ialah Bosou Ikan (dicampur dengan batang pisang atau 'polod').

Resipi:


Ikan Turongo

Nasi

Panggi

Sayur Polod atau batang pisang

Garam

Campurkan bahan-bahan tersebut sehingga rata. Kemudian, masukkan ke dalam bekas (tempayan kecil) dan tutup rapat supaya tidak di masuki angin. Biarkan selama 2 minggu.Bosou, dalam bahasa Malaysia bererti jeruk. Ia diperbuat daripada ikan basah, daging dan sayur-sayuran seperti 'polod' (kulit sejenis pokok palma) lalu dicampur dengan 'panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Bosou merupakan makanan kegemaran orang KadazanDusun sejak dahulu lagi. Ia biasanya dimakan secara berkumpulan seperti ahli keluarga.

Bosou yang terkenal ialah Bosou Ikan (dicampur dengan batang pisang atau 'polod').

Resipi:


Ikan Turongo

Nasi

Panggi

Sayur Polod atau batang pisang

Garam

Campurkan bahan-bahan tersebut sehingga rata. Kemudian, masukkan ke dalam bekas (tempayan kecil) dan tutup rapat supaya tidak di masuki angin. Biarkan selama 2 minggu.Bosou, dalam bahasa Malaysia bererti jeruk. Ia diperbuat daripada ikan basah, daging dan sayur-sayuran seperti 'polod' (kulit sejenis pokok palma) lalu dicampur dengan 'panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Bosou merupakan makanan kegemaran orang KadazanDusun sejak dahulu lagi. Ia biasanya dimakan secara berkumpulan seperti ahli keluarga.

Bosou yang terkenal ialah Bosou Ikan (dicampur dengan batang pisang atau 'polod').

Resipi:


Ikan Turongo

Nasi

Panggi

Sayur Polod atau batang pisang

Garam

Campurkan bahan-bahan tersebut sehingga rata. Kemudian, masukkan ke dalam bekas (tempayan kecil) dan tutup rapat supaya tidak di masuki angin. Biarkan selama 2 minggu.Bosou, dalam bahasa Malaysia bererti jeruk. Ia diperbuat daripada ikan basah, daging dan sayur-sayuran seperti 'polod' (kulit sejenis pokok palma) lalu dicampur dengan 'panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Bosou merupakan makanan kegemaran orang KadazanDusun sejak dahulu lagi. Ia biasanya dimakan secara berkumpulan seperti ahli keluarga.

Bosou yang terkenal ialah Bosou Ikan (dicampur dengan batang pisang atau 'polod').

Resipi:


Ikan Turongo

Nasi

Panggi

Sayur Polod atau batang pisang

Garam

Campurkan bahan-bahan tersebut sehingga rata. Kemudian, masukkan ke dalam bekas (tempayan kecil) dan tutup rapat supaya tidak di masuki angin. Biarkan selama 2 minggu.Bosou, dalam bahasa Malaysia bererti jeruk. Ia diperbuat daripada ikan basah, daging dan sayur-sayuran seperti 'polod' (kulit sejenis pokok palma) lalu dicampur dengan 'panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Bosou merupakan makanan kegemaran orang KadazanDusun sejak dahulu lagi. Ia biasanya dimakan secara berkumpulan seperti ahli keluarga.

Bosou yang terkenal ialah Bosou Ikan (dicampur dengan batang pisang atau 'polod').

Resipi:


Ikan Turongo

Nasi

Panggi

Sayur Polod atau batang pisang

Garam

Campurkan bahan-bahan tersebut sehingga rata. Kemudian, masukkan ke dalam bekas (tempayan kecil) dan tutup rapat supaya tidak di masuki angin. Biarkan selama 2 minggu.Bosou, dalam bahasa Malaysia bererti jeruk. Ia diperbuat daripada ikan basah, daging dan sayur-sayuran seperti 'polod' (kulit sejenis pokok palma) lalu dicampur dengan 'panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Bosou merupakan makanan kegemaran orang KadazanDusun sejak dahulu lagi. Ia biasanya dimakan secara berkumpulan seperti ahli keluarga.

Bosou yang terkenal ialah Bosou Ikan (dicampur dengan batang pisang atau 'polod').

Resipi:


Ikan Turongo

Nasi

Panggi

Sayur Polod atau batang pisang

Garam

Campurkan bahan-bahan tersebut sehingga rata. Kemudian, masukkan ke dalam bekas (tempayan kecil) dan tutup rapat supaya tidak di masuki angin. Biarkan selama 2 minggu.Bosou, dalam bahasa Malaysia bererti jeruk. Ia diperbuat daripada ikan basah, daging dan sayur-sayuran seperti 'polod' (kulit sejenis pokok palma) lalu dicampur dengan 'panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Bosou merupakan makanan kegemaran orang KadazanDusun sejak dahulu lagi. Ia biasanya dimakan secara berkumpulan seperti ahli keluarga.

Bosou yang terkenal ialah Bosou Ikan (dicampur dengan batang pisang atau 'polod').

Resipi:


Ikan Turongo

Nasi

Panggi

Sayur Polod atau batang pisang

Garam

Campurkan bahan-bahan tersebut sehingga rata. Kemudian, masukkan ke dalam bekas (tempayan kecil) dan tutup rapat supaya tidak di masuki angin. Biarkan selama 2 minggu.Bosou, dalam bahasa Malaysia bererti jeruk. Ia diperbuat daripada ikan basah, daging dan sayur-sayuran seperti 'polod' (kulit sejenis pokok palma) lalu dicampur dengan 'panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Bosou merupakan makanan kegemaran orang KadazanDusun sejak dahulu lagi. Ia biasanya dimakan secara berkumpulan seperti ahli keluarga.

Bosou yang terkenal ialah Bosou Ikan (dicampur dengan batang pisang atau 'polod').

Resipi:


Ikan Turongo

Nasi

Panggi

Sayur Polod atau batang pisang

Garam

Campurkan bahan-bahan tersebut sehingga rata. Kemudian, masukkan ke dalam bekas (tempayan kecil) dan tutup rapat supaya tidak di masuki angin. Biarkan selama 2 minggu.Bosou, dalam bahasa Malaysia bererti jeruk. Ia diperbuat daripada ikan basah, daging dan sayur-sayuran seperti 'polod' (kulit sejenis pokok palma) lalu dicampur dengan 'panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Bosou merupakan makanan kegemaran orang KadazanDusun sejak dahulu lagi. Ia biasanya dimakan secara berkumpulan seperti ahli keluarga.

Bosou yang terkenal ialah Bosou Ikan (dicampur dengan batang pisang atau 'polod').

Resipi:


Ikan Turongo

Nasi

Panggi

Sayur Polod atau batang pisang

Garam

Campurkan bahan-bahan tersebut sehingga rata. Kemudian, masukkan ke dalam bekas (tempayan kecil) dan tutup rapat supaya tidak di masuki angin. Biarkan selama 2 minggu.Bosou, dalam bahasa Malaysia bererti jeruk. Ia diperbuat daripada ikan basah, daging dan sayur-sayuran seperti 'polod' (kulit sejenis pokok palma) lalu dicampur dengan 'panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Bosou merupakan makanan kegemaran orang KadazanDusun sejak dahulu lagi. Ia biasanya dimakan secara berkumpulan seperti ahli keluarga.

Bosou yang terkenal ialah Bosou Ikan (dicampur dengan batang pisang atau 'polod').

Resipi:


Ikan Turongo

Nasi

Panggi

Sayur Polod atau batang pisang

Garam

Campurkan bahan-bahan tersebut sehingga rata. Kemudian, masukkan ke dalam bekas (tempayan kecil) dan tutup rapat supaya tidak di masuki angin. Biarkan selama 2 minggu.Bosou, dalam bahasa Malaysia bererti jeruk. Ia diperbuat daripada ikan basah, daging dan sayur-sayuran seperti 'polod' (kulit sejenis pokok palma) lalu dicampur dengan 'panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Bosou merupakan makanan kegemaran orang KadazanDusun sejak dahulu lagi. Ia biasanya dimakan secara berkumpulan seperti ahli keluarga.

Bosou yang terkenal ialah Bosou Ikan (dicampur dengan batang pisang atau 'polod').

Resipi:


Ikan Turongo

Nasi

Panggi

Sayur Polod atau batang pisang

Garam

Campurkan bahan-bahan tersebut sehingga rata. Kemudian, masukkan ke dalam bekas (tempayan kecil) dan tutup rapat supaya tidak di masuki angin. Biarkan selama 2 minggu.Bosou, dalam bahasa Malaysia bererti jeruk. Ia diperbuat daripada ikan basah, daging dan sayur-sayuran seperti 'polod' (kulit sejenis pokok palma) lalu dicampur dengan 'panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Bosou merupakan makanan kegemaran orang KadazanDusun sejak dahulu lagi. Ia biasanya dimakan secara berkumpulan seperti ahli keluarga.

Bosou yang terkenal ialah Bosou Ikan (dicampur dengan batang pisang atau 'polod').

Resipi:


Ikan Turongo

Nasi

Panggi

Sayur Polod atau batang pisang

Garam

Campurkan bahan-bahan tersebut sehingga rata. Kemudian, masukkan ke dalam bekas (tempayan kecil) dan tutup rapat supaya tidak di masuki angin. Biarkan selama 2 minggu.Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.

Campuran ini kemudiannya akan diperam di dalam bekas (biasanya daripada tajau kecil) dan ditutup rapat selama seminggu atau sehingga betul-betul telah masak sebelum dapat dimakan. Sekiranya nasi yang digunakan baru di masak, campuran itu akan dibiarkan sehingga mencapai suhu bilik sebelum disimpan. Bosou biasanya disimpan dalam bekas tertutup kemas, kedap udara.
Bosou disediakan daripada daging atau ikan mentah yang akan digaul bersama-sama dengan nasi putih, garam, dan buah. Ia juga boleh ditambah dengan buah nangka, nenas muda, dan tuhau bagi menambah perisa. Batang pisang atau 'polod' juga kadang-kala dicampurkan kepada bosou ini. 'Panggi' iaitu sejenis bahan pengawet juga boleh ditambah untuk mengelakkannya daripada menjadi basi dan berbau busuk.[/spoiler]
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Re: Makanan tradisional anda???

Postby Bukit_Padang_Roller » Sat Aug 13, 2011 2:50 pm

niari mcm ikang pari owh :hmmm:
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Re: Makanan tradisional anda???

Postby orangaslisabah » Sat Aug 13, 2011 3:04 pm

Bukit_Padang_Roller wrote:niari mcm ikang pari owh :hmmm:

Mcm biasa sia dingar ni loghat sana pasar pilipin kk oh :slaugh:
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Re: Makanan tradisional anda???

Postby Bukit_Padang_Roller » Sat Aug 13, 2011 3:10 pm

orangaslisabah wrote:
Bukit_Padang_Roller wrote:niari mcm ikang pari owh :hmmm:

Mcm biasa sia dingar ni loghat sana pasar pilipin kk oh :slaugh:

sa xpernah kerja mana2 kadai dobi ar :lol2:
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Re: Makanan tradisional anda???

Postby orangaslisabah » Sat Aug 13, 2011 4:29 pm

Bukit_Padang_Roller wrote:
orangaslisabah wrote:
Bukit_Padang_Roller wrote:niari mcm ikang pari owh :hmmm:

Mcm biasa sia dingar ni loghat sana pasar pilipin kk oh :slaugh:

sa xpernah kerja mana2 kadai dobi ar :lol2:

Hahaha..nasib baik bukang loghat ini yg sana kadai dobi :lol2:
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Re: Makanan tradisional anda???

Postby Bukit_Padang_Roller » Sun Aug 14, 2011 6:19 am

cuna minta dlu tu gps kadai dobi :hmmm:
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Re: Makanan tradisional anda???

Postby TimG » Wed Aug 17, 2011 2:45 pm

share2 gambar time se balik kg. sadap juga ni barang oh

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